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Cannabinoid may up survival rate for pancreatic cancer patients

02 August 2018

Response: Each year around 9,800 people in the United Kingdom are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is extracted by soaking the plant in alcohol and then evaporating the liquid.

A cannabis drug may help to extend the lives of pancreatic cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, new research suggests.

We found that mice with pancreatic cancer survived almost three times longer if a constituent of medicinal cannabis was added to their chemotherapy treatment", said Marco Falasca, a professor at the Queen Mary University of London."Cannabidiol is already approved for use in clinics, which means we can quickly go on to test this in human clinical trials.

Cannabidiol or CBD is an element in cannabis that does not have psychoactive effects or the feeling of being high.

Pancreatic cancers begin when cells in the pancreas begin to multiply uncontrollably and form an abnormal and excessive tissue growth with the potential to spread to other parts of the body.

Clinical trials are still needed to determine if CBD use in conjunction with chemotherapy treatments would improve life expectancy rates for humans diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Curtin University's Professor Marco Falasca led the research. However if you want to make a cannabis beer in California, you'll have to make sure it's non-alcoholic.

There are few options for pancreatic cancer treatments available and the five-year survival rate is less than 7 percent, so Falasca stresses the search for new treatments is very urgent for this specific type of cancer.

Cannabidiol is already cleared for use in clinics and does not face the same challenges as products such as cannabis oil, which contain controlled substances.

The researchers said it is also known to improve the side effects of chemotherapy including nausea, diarrhoea and vomiting.

About half of all cases are diagnosed in people over 75 years old.

"Cannabidiol is already approved for use in clinics, which means we can quickly go on to test this in human clinical trials".

Study author Professor Nick Lemoine, from Barts Cancer Institute, told the Evening Standard: 'We have achieved what appears to be cures in the animal models, but this still remains early days. News is increasingly biased, corrupt, or agenda driven.

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Cannabinoid may up survival rate for pancreatic cancer patients