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Hungary to explore legal steps to challenge critical European Union ruling

15 September 2018

"I have always been in favour of building bridges and I want to continue to do so but yesterday I didn't see any readiness from the Hungarian PM to make a move towards his European Union partners and address our concerns", he said on Twitter. Needing a two-thirds majority to pass, it was approved by 69.4 percent of the lawmakers.

On Tuesday, Orban said his country was being targeted for choosing not to be "a country of migrants" as he dismissed charges of corruption.

Dutch Greens MEP Judith Sargentini, who spearheaded the vote, smiled broadly and breathed a sigh of relief before embracing parliament supporters in the French city of Strasbourg.

"Hungary shall continue to defend its borders, stop illegal immigration and defend its rights - against you, too, if necessary", he said, drawing applause from the eurosceptic, far-right lawmakers in the assembly. "They deserve freedom of speech, non-discrimination, tolerance, justice and equality, all of which are enshrined in the European treaties".

"Another long-term agreement is not on the agenda yet since we have to come to an agreement about year 2020, although some. preparatory negotiations on how to go forward have been launched", Szijjarto said on the sidelines of a news conference".

Following the passage of the law, which many in Hungary saw as part of the government's wider crackdown on dissent, the Budapest-based University began holding classes in the USA in partnership with New York's Bard College earlier this year. We'll speak with Mounk about the parliament's decision and how right-wing coalitions are shaping Europe.

Wiith 448 votes for, 197 against and 48 abstentions, the MPs adopted a report recommending the activation of procedure under Article 7 of the Treaty on the European Union, according to which Hungary may be punished to the extent that it is stripped of the right to vote.

Grabbe's organization is part of the Open Society Foundations set up by Hungarian-American billionaire and philanthropist George Soros, an ideological opponent of Orban and blamed by the Hungarian leader, along with the NGOs Soros supports, for promoting mass immigration into Europe.

Orban received a rebuke even from fellow members of the European People's Party (EPP), whose support he had counted on.

The issue will now be taken up another legislative body of the European Union, the Council of Ministers. She expected, however, that she would be invited to a European Council summit to present her report.

Orban, whose right-wing Fidesz party has governed Hungary since 2010 and was re-elected in April for a third consecutive term on a strongly anti-immigrant platform, is playing a long-term political game in Europe.

The parties of Kurz and Orban both belong to the biggest faction in the European Parliament, the conservative European People's Party (EPP), which also includes lawmakers from the party of German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

The Commission, headed by EPP member Jean-Claude Juncker, has repeatedly clashed with Orban's government, especially since Budapest refused to admit asylum seekers under an European Union scheme launched at the height of the migration crisis in 2015.

Hungary to explore legal steps to challenge critical European Union ruling