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Soyuz Rocket Failure Caused by Collision Between First and Second Stages

17 October 2018

"I didn't expect it to be quite this memorable."He gave all credit to his flight partner, who led the way once they learned of the booster failure and guided them to the successful hard landing in the Kazakh countryside".

Neither man was hurt, and an investigation is under way to find out why the rocket failed.

A minor air spill was recognized on August 30 on the Soyuz MS-09 spaceship that is docked to the ISS.

Hague said he and Ovchinin, his commander, were flung from side to side and shoved back hard into their seats, as the drama unfolded 50 kilometres (31 miles) above Kazakhstan last Thursday. They braced for the extreme force - seven times the force of gravity - of the unusually steep descent and the shock of the parachutes popping open.

In this frame from video from NASA TV, NASA astronaut Nick Hague, who survived the Oct. 11, 2018, failed launch and emergency landing, speaks from the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, Oct. 16, 2018. "Luckily for us, it was smooth flat terrain".

Mr Hague said he and his crewmate grinned at touchdown, shook hands and then joked about their short flight.

He's grateful the emergency system worked despite the fact it hadn't been called into action for decades.

NASA's Hague has already flown back to the United States following the landing, after undergoing a medical check and being questioned about the accident.

The Russian spacecraft has been the only way to send replacement crews to the International Space Station since NASA retired the space shuttle fleet in 2011.

They flew to the orbit taking Russia's Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft that blasted off on June 6 and they are scheduled to stay onboard the space station for 187 days. "Sometimes you don't get a vote", Hague said.

A Russian space agency official said on Friday that Russia still planned to go ahead as planned with its next manned flight to the ISS in December despite a rocket failure this week.

Soyuz Rocket Failure Caused by Collision Between First and Second Stages