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Duke of Edinburgh gives up driving licence after Sandringham crash

10 February 2019

Queen Elizabeth II's 97-year-old husband Prince Philip on Saturday surrendered his driving licence after causing a vehicle crash that outraged the media and stirred a debate about old age and driving.

A statement from Buckingham Palace said: "After careful consideration the Duke of Edinburgh has taken the decision to voluntarily surrender his driving licence".

He apologised for his part in an accident on the Sandringham estate in Norfolk when his Land Rover Freelander collided with another vehicle on January 17, leaving two women needing hospital treatment.

The accident left the Duke's auto flipped onto its side, with a witness later telling the Press Association that he helped pull a bloodied Philip from the vehicle.

Further controversy followed when photographs showing the Duke driving without wearing a seatbelt were released.

He was given "suitable words of advice" according to Norfolk Police.

"We review each file carefully before a decision is made and will take this development into account, a spokesperson told The Telegraph, in reference to the license surrender".

United Kingdom police sent their investigation of the crash to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), which is considering whether to bring charges against Prince Philip over the crash last month.

They also added that the "file for the collision has been passed to the Crown Prosecution Service for their consideration".

The incident on January 17 raised questions about whether Prince Philip, who is 97 and retired from royal duties in 2017, should still have been driving.

He also wished her a "speedy recovery" from what he described as a "very distressing experience".

Following the collision, Prince Philip wrote a letter of apology to Emma.

"It will be the queen, she'll be the only one who can really tell him", Ingrid Seward, editor in chief of Majesty Magazine, told British ITV after the crash. I was pleasantly surprised because of the personalised nature.

Fairweather has previously denied that it was sunny on the day of the accident, telling Great Britain's This Morning that she remembered the weather being "miserable and overcast".

Duke of Edinburgh gives up driving licence after Sandringham crash