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New Italian law requires students to be vaccinated or face repercussions

14 March 2019

A 2017 law mandated children enrolled in Italian schools receive 10 different vaccines, the Times wrote, in "response to a worrisome decline in vaccinations nationwide and a measles outbreak that same year".

After months of heated debate, a law in Italy has finally entered into force, mandating that children must be vaccinated to be accepted into school.

Much like OR and Washington, Italy has been experiencing a measles outbreak due to unvaccinated children.

It also fines parents of children between 6 and 16 years old about $560 if they can not prove their children have been vaccinated.

Italian children under six who haven't had their compulsory vaccinations will be turned away from school - and their parents fined up to €500 - under a new law. It is named after the former health minister Beatrice Lorenzin who had first introduced it. Ms Grillo said the rules were now simple, "No vaccine, no school".

Prove your kid is vaccinated or pay up, Italian parents are being told. Despite political pressure to extend the deadline, Health Minister Giulia Grillo kept it at March 11, saying "No vaccine, no school".

The last day for parents to turn in vaccine documents was Monday.

These include vaccinations for chickenpox, polio, measles, mumps, and rubella.

For years, confusion about vaccines has reigned in Italy. With rates below 80 percent, the country lags far behind the World Health Organization's 95 percent target.

The city of Bologna reportedly has at least 300 children who now do not comply with the vaccination requirements and are at risk of suspension from school.

The government, which had initially opposed the Lorenzin law, reversed that position after what it called "a measles emergency", and criticism from health experts accusing the anti-vaccination movement of "sending Italy back to the Middle Ages". Such a low rate adversely affects herd immunity that prevents the spread of infection.

New Italian law requires students to be vaccinated or face repercussions